Tag Archives: teaching culture

Schools: A Changed Perspective

Summary: On the cusp of the end of a career in schools and the onset of a blog infested retirement, some meditations on the changed perspective the shift in life imposes. And a plea for stories, please. This summer I … Continue reading

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Charter Schools: The Emerging Lessons

Summary: A review of lessons from charter schools so far unfortunately boils down to more money for staffing to reach at risk kids, and creative changes in the context through which kids approach school, also likely to require more funding. … Continue reading

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At Risk Students: Technology and Improving Student Performance

Summary: Can a new generation of online instruction free teachers to work more closely with at risk students? Some tech types paradoxically champion technology as one key to unlock more resources for education in troubled economic times. Highly qualified individuals … Continue reading

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Schools and Bureaucracy: Reflections on Survival and Other Personal Idiosyncrasies: Part C

Summary: Being the last installment of a series of reflections on long term survival in the belly of the educational beast.….. Despite the relentless bureaucratic monolith, pockets of encouragement and support for individual vision occur, which have helped my longevity. … Continue reading

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School Politics: Is Teacher Evaluation Destined for the Rabbit Hole? (Part B)

  Last post (5/18/12) I introduced an article by Jenny Anderson in the New York Times, February 19, 2012, “States Try to Fix Quirks in Teacher Evaluations”, and explored some of the ins and outs of reform efforts in teacher … Continue reading

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Schools and Bureaucracy and Some Politics: Empower Your People; Chrysler Does — Part D

Summary: Referring back to last week’s post, a plan to provide study time in our school served as a promising example of the incremental changes needed to further reform in schools. The story is here continued. On what seemed to … Continue reading

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Schools and Bureaucracy: Empower Your People; Chrysler Does — Part C

Summary: A program to provide extra help to struggling students in one school shows the potential inherent in staff/administration cooperative planning. Among the casualties of recession driven budget cuts in our school was the after school activity bus, admittedly a … Continue reading

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Schools and Bureaucracy: Empower Your People; Chrysler Does — Part B

Summary: A fledgling initiative in Washington State with exceeding promise nonetheless demonstrates the pitfalls of hierarchical directives. Politicians talk about the rising gap between the rich and the poor, the upper economic classes and the lower economic classes. In Washington … Continue reading

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Schools Bureaucracy: Empower Your People; Chrysler Does (Part A)

The next few posts will compare one example of a recent American corporate success that has valued the creative and cognitive input of workers and staff with two organizational episodes taken from my school experience. The first of these school … Continue reading

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School Bureaucracy: We Now Learn Good Teachers Are Valuable

Summary: Another in a string of commentary about flattening the school hierarchy, and the value of teacher and staff input to decision making. Age old is the tale of the teacher, from the wise one, to the prophet, to the … Continue reading

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